Mathematica Policy Research Inc.    [Disclaimer] has completed the following briefs summarizing several of the Ticket to Work Evaluation Reports.

Seventh Ticket to Work Evaluation Report

New Evidence on the Role of Provider Business Model in the Economic Viability of Employment Networks Under Ticket to Work. Disability Policy Research Brief #13-04. Jody Schimmel, July 2013.

In 2008, we revised the Ticket to Work (TTW) program to make it more attractive to providers of employment support services. This issue brief summarizes findings about recent TTW participant work activity for five Employment Network (EN) business models and considers the implications for EN financial viability.

Full report: “Participant and Provider Outcomes Since the Inception of Ticket to Work and the Effects of the 2008 Regulatory Changes”

Regulatory Changes and the Recession: How Did They Affect Ticket to Work Participants’ Employment Efforts? Disability Policy Research Brief #13-03. Jody Schimmel, July 2013.

In 2008, we revised the TTW program to make it more attractive to providers of employment support services. This issue brief explores the extent to which the regulatory changes encouraged more ENs to assist TTW participants, as well as changes in participants’ work activity during this time. It also highlights the possible effects of the economic recession (2007 to 2009) on participants’ efforts to return to work.

Full report: “Participant and Provider Outcomes Since the Inception of Ticket to Work and the Effects of the 2008 Regulatory Changes”

Ticket to Work Participants: Then and Now. Disability Policy Research Brief #13-01. Crystal Blyler, Denise Hoffman, and Gina Livermore, May 2013.

In 2008, we revised the Ticket to Work (TTW) program to make it more attractive to providers of employment support services. This issue brief discusses how the TTW participant population has changed under the revised regulations and examines how the regulations may have affected beneficiary service use, employment outcomes, and satisfaction with TTW.

Full report: “Ticket to Work Participant Characteristics and Outcomes Under the Revised Regulations”

Sixth Ticket to Work Evaluation Report

The Work Experiences of New SSI Beneficiaries:  A Longitudinal Perspective.  Disability Policy Research Brief #12-06.  Yonatan Ben-Shalom and David Stapleton, November 2012.

This issue brief presents longitudinal employment and exit-for-work statistics for SSI beneficiaries followed for at least 6 years and as many as 11 years after the point at which they first received their award. These longitudinal statistics show that about one in five SSI beneficiaries work at some point while on cash benefits and the percentage who eventually forgo benefits because of work (a longitudinal statistic) is far larger than the percentage who forgo benefits because of work in a given month (a cross-sectional statistic).

Full report: “Longitudinal Statistics for New Supplemental Security Income Beneficiaries”

Service Providers' Experiences Under the Revised Ticket to Work Regulations. Disability Policy Research Brief #12-04. Sarah Prenovitz, February 2012.

In 2008, we revised the regulations for Ticket to Work, a federal program created to improve incentives and supports for people who receive disability benefits to seek employment. This issue brief discusses how Ticket to Work participation by service providers and beneficiaries has changed under the revised regulations. It also describes providers' early experiences with these regulations.

Full report: “Provider Experiences under the Revised Ticket to Work Regulations

The Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Program: Promoting Employment Among Social Security Disability Beneficiaries. Disability Policy Research Brief #11-05. Jody Schimmel, Bonnie O'Day, and Allison Roche, January 2012.

This issue brief summarizes findings from the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program, a Social Security Administration program to promote employment by providing beneficiaries with information about federal work supports.

Full report: “Evaluation of the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) Program: Beneficiaries Served, Services Provided and Program Costs,” Final Report and Appendix

Fifth Ticket to Work Evaluation Report

How Many Disability Beneficiaries Forgo Cash Benefits Because of Work? Evidence from a New Measure. Disability Policy Research Brief #12-03. Jody Schimmel and David Stapleton, February 2012.

This issue brief summarizes findings from a longer report by Mathematica's disability experts, who used a new indicator to determine how many beneficiaries receiving Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income forgo cash benefits because of work.

Full report: “Time That Beneficiaries Spend Off the Rolls Due to Work and the Payments Generated for Employment Networks (ENs)”

How Many SSDI Beneficiaries Leave the Rolls for Work? More Than You Might Think. Disability Policy Research Brief #10-01. Su Liu and David Stapleton, April 2010.

Based on beneficiaries’ actions over a short period, “cross-sectional” statistics show the percentage of new SSDI beneficiaries who eventually leave the rolls for work is about one-half of one percent.  This issue brief presents longitudinal employment and exit-for-work statistics for SSDI beneficiaries followed for 10 years after the point at which they first received their award. These longitudinal statistics show that the percentage who eventually leave the rolls for work is several times larger than one-half of one percent.

Full report: “Longitudinal Statistics for New Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries”

Work-Oriented Social Security Disability Beneficiaries: Characteristics and Employment-Related Activities. Disability Policy Research Brief #09-05. Gina A. Livermore, December 2009.

This brief discusses the characteristics of working-age individuals receiving Social Security disability benefits with work goals and describes their employment success. The findings suggest that beneficiaries fall into three broad groups based on their work-related efforts and expectations. For 60 percent, gainful employment seems to be neither a plan nor an option. Of the 40 percent who are interested in working, about half are actively pursuing and achieving this goal.

Full report: “SSI and DI Beneficiaries with Work-Related Goals and Expectations”