LIST OF FIGURES


| CHAPTER II | CHAPTER III | CHAPTER IV | CHAPTER V |
| CHAPTER VI | CHAPTER VIII | CHAPTER IX |


CHAPTER II

II.1 Ticket Mailings, by Month and Phase (in Thousands)
This bar graph shows the number of Tickets mailed each month from February 2002 to March 2004; the number of Tickets mailed increased steadily per month for Phase 1, peaking in June 2002 at about 750,000. Starting in July 2002, the number of mailings for each phase was roughly constant, with mailings for Phase 2 states beginning in November 2002 and Phase 3 states in November 2003.

II.2 Participation Rate, by Months Since Rollout Start and Phase
This line graph shows that the participation rate in Phase 2 states is lower overall than that of Phase 1 states, but that both are rising at about the same rate.

II.3 Participation Rates, by Months Since Rollout Start and Provider Type
This line graph shows the rates at which beneficiaries assigned Tickets to ENs and SVRAs in Phases 1 and 2; Phase 1 and Phase 2 beneficiaries participate at SVRAs at a much higher rate than at ENs. Phase 1 beneficiaries have a higher rate of participation at SVRAs than do Phase 2 beneficiaries; the participation rate at ENs is almost identical for Phase 1 and 2 beneficiaries.

II.4 First Assignments At SVRAs, by Months Since Rollout Start and Phase
This line graph shows that Phase 1 SVRA first assignments rose rapidly at first but leveled off at between 1,000 and 1,500 per month 8 months after rollout. Phase 2 SVRA first assignments rose slower initially and started holding steady at a little less than 1,000 about 11 months after rollout.

II.5 Participation Rates for the New Payment Systems, by Months Since Rollout and Phase
This line graph shows participation rates by payment system and phase; for Phases 1 and 2, the participation rate is much higher for the milestone + outcome payment system than for outcomes only payment system.

II.6 Ticket Participation Rates in Phase 1 and Phase 2 States, by State, Provider Type, and Payment Type, March 2004
This bar graph shows participation rates for Phase 1 and 2 states by provider type and payment type as of March 2004. Participation rates for Phase 1 states ranged from 0.4% in Oregon to about 2.3% in Vermont , with the great majority of providers in all states being SVRAs and the majority of payment types being the traditional system. In Phase 2 states, participation rates ranged from about 0.2% in New Hampshire to 1.7% in North Dakota , with the great majority of providers in all states again being SVRAs and the majority of Tickets assigned under the traditional payment system.

II.7 Ticket Participation Rates in Phase 1 States, by Use of Other Work Incentives, March 2004
This bar graph shows that while most beneficiaries do not use work incentives (the Extended Period of Eligibility for DI beneficiaries and Section 1619 eligibility for SSI beneficiaries) those who do are much more likely—as much as two to three times higher—to assign their Tickets.

II.8 Ticket Participation Rates in Phase 1 States by Education, March 2004
This bar and line graph shows that Ticket participation rates in Phase 1 states are higher among beneficiaries with higher education, peaking at about 1.5% for eligible beneficiaries with 13-15 years of schooling.

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CHAPTER III

III.1 Sociodemographic Characteristics of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the sociodemographic characteristics of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. Most TTW participants were similar to beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview, but they differed from all beneficiaries (usually by a wide margin) on characteristics such as age, race, gender, marital status, and education.

III.2 Living Arrangements and Children of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the living arrangements of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; relative to all beneficiaries, a slightly higher percentage of TTW participants lives alone, while a slightly lower percentage lives with all or some of their own children.

III.3 Age At onset of Limiting Health Condition(s) of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows age at onset of health condition(s) of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. TTW participants and beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview were much more likely to have been less than 18 years old at the time younger at their age of onset than the general beneficiary population.

III.4 Condition(s) Causing Activity Limitation of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the breakdown of condition(s) causing activity limitation of working-aged beneficiaries, by TTW and employment status; For all groups, the most common specific condition given was mental illness, selected by about a third of respondents (respondents could select more than one reason). Mental retardation was more common among beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview. The catch-all category "other" contains 63 percent of all beneficiaries and almost 50 percent of TTW participants or those employed at the time of the survey.

III.5 Health Status of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the health status of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; TTW and working beneficiaries were almost three times more likely to describe their health status "excellent" or "very good" than were all beneficiaries combined, while TTW and working beneficiaries were only half as likely to describe their health status as "poor" or "very poor" compared with the general beneficiary population.

III.6 Number of ADL/IADL Difficulties of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the number of ADL/IADL difficulties experienced by working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. Almost twice as many TTW participants and working beneficiaries said they had no functional difficulties, compared to the general beneficiary population.

III.7 Prevalence of Difficulty Performing Specific Activities of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the prevalence of difficulty among working-age beneficiaries in performing certain activities; in general, TTW and employed beneficiaries have less difficulty performing all activities than did the general beneficiary population. However, the more involved or physically vigorous the activity, the more likely that all three groups will have trouble with it.

III.8 Body Mass index of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows that body mass index of working-age beneficiaries who participate in TTW or who were working at the time of the survey does not differ substantially from the index for all beneficiaries.

III.9 Current Health Compared with Last Year of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the distribution of changes in general health status since last year for work-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; compared to the general beneficiary population, TTW and employed beneficiaries were more likely to say that their health was "much or somewhat better" and less likely to say it was "much or somewhat worse" than the general beneficiary population.

III.10 Disability Program Status of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows the disability program status of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; compared to both all beneficiaries combined and employed beneficiaries, TTW beneficiaries are slightly less likely to be DI-only and slightly more likely to be in concurrent status.

III.11 Health insurance Status At interview of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows health insurance status of working-age beneficiaries, by TTW and employment status. Approximately 90 percent of beneficiaries in each group had Medicaid and/or Medicare. TTW participants were somewhat less likely to have private insurance than were employed beneficiaries or the general beneficiary population.

III.12 Sources of Private Coverage Among Those with Private insurance of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status
This bar graph shows sources of private health coverage among working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. Beneficiaries involved in TTW or who were employed at the time of interview are slightly more likely to have private insurance through their own employment and slightly less likely to have private insurance through their spouses.

III.13 Heard of TTW or A Program Like TTW Among Working-Age Beneficiaries
This bar graph shows the percentage of working-age beneficiaries who had heard of TTW, or a program like it, by phase. Although about one-third of working-age beneficiaries in all three phases had heard of TTW or a program like it, a full 83% of Phase 1 Ticket participants had heard of TTW or a program like it.

III.14 Employment Among Working Age Beneficiaries
This bar graph shows employment among working-age beneficiaries; TTW participants were almost three times as likely as all working-age beneficiaries to be employed at the time of the interview. Beneficiaries who were employed at the time of the interview and TTW participants were far more likely than the other groups to be employed in 2003.

III.15 Expectations About Future Employment
This bar graph shows expectations about future employment, comparing SSI-only beneficiaries, DI-only beneficiaries, concurrent beneficiaries, TTW participants, beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview, and all beneficiaries. Beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview and TTW participants were more likely to have personal goals that include work/career advancement, to see themselves working for pay in the next year, and to see themselves working for pay in the next five years. TTW participants were slightly more likely than the other groups to see themselves working and earning enough to stop receiving disability benefits in the next year; TTW participants were also much more likely to see themselves earning enough to stop receiving benefits in the next five years.

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CHAPTER IV

IV.1 Phase 1 Ticket Recipients with Zero Benefits (eligible for TTW on 1/12/2002)
This line graph shows the percentage of Phase 1 Ticket recipients with zero benefits for the months before and after the Ticket was mailed. The percentage of DI and SSI beneficiaries with zero benefits dropped gradually until about 5 months before the Ticket was mailed, leveling off for SSI beneficiaries at about 2% for a few months before gradually rising to about 3.5% 14 months after the mailing. The share of DI beneficiaries with zero benefits leveled off at about 1% 5 months before the Ticket mailing, rising very gradually after that to about 1.5% 14 months after the mailing.

IV.2 Phase 1 Ticket Recipients with Zero Benefits and Substantial Employment (eligible for TTW on 1/12/2002)
This line graph shows the percentage of Phase 1 Ticket recipients with zero benefits and substantial employment by SSI or DI status. SSI recipients remained level at 0.5% before and after the Ticket mailing, while the percentage of DI recipients with zero benefits and substantial employment dropped steadily from 1.5% to 0.5% 5 months before the mailing, remaining at 0.5% afterwards.

IV.3 Average Monthly Benefit of Phase 1 Ticket Recipients (eligible for TTW on 1/12/2002)
This line graph shows the average monthly benefit of Phase 1 Ticket recipients relative to the months since the Ticket was mailed. DI recipients' average monthly benefits rose slightly from just under $800 to just over $800 in the 12 months before the Ticket was mailed to 14 months afterwards, while SSI recipients' average benefit stayed relatively level at about $520.

IV.4 Phase 1 Ticket Recipients with Zero Benefits, by Ticket Assignment (Eligible for TTW on 1/12/2002)
This figure has two line graphs one for DI beneficiaries and one for SSI beneficiaries. The graphs show Phase 1 Ticket recipients with zero benefits in each month for a period starting 12 months before their Ticket was mailed and ending 14 months after mailing. Each graph shows a pair of U-shaped curves indicating that the percent of beneficiaries with zero benefits is lowest around the month when tickets were mailed. The U-shaped curves are narrower for those beneficiaries who assigned their tickets. That is, 6 to 12 months before tickets were mailed and 6 to 14 months after the Ticket mailing, beneficiaries who assigned their tickets were more likely to have zero benefits.

IV.5 Phase 1 Ticket Recipients with Zero Benefits and Substantial Employment, by Ticket Assignment (Eligible for TTW on 1/12/2002)
This figure has two line graphs one for DI beneficiaries and one for SSI beneficiaries. The graphs show Phase 1 Ticket recipients with zero benefits and substantial employment in each month for a period starting 12 months before their Ticket was mailed and ending 14 months after mailing. Each graph shows a pair of U-shaped curves indicating that the percent of beneficiaries with zero benefits and substantial earnings is lowest around the month when tickets were mailed. The U-shaped curves for those beneficiaries who assigned their tickets are slightly above those for the beneficiaries who did not assign their tickets. The graph for SSI beneficiaries shows a sharp increase during the 6 months after ticket mailing in the fraction of beneficiaries who assigned their tickets who have zero benefits and substantial earnings (although the absolute value of the increase is only from 0.7 percent in the month after mailing to 2 percent 6 months after mailing).

IV.6 Average Monthly Benefit of Phase 1 Ticket Recipients, by Ticket Assignment (Eligible for TTW on 1/12/2002)
This figure has two line graphs one for DI beneficiaries and one for SSI beneficiaries. The graphs show average benefit payment to Phase 1 Ticket recipients in each month for a period starting 12 months before their Ticket was mailed and ending 14 months after mailing. Each graph shows a pair of fairly flat curves indicating average benefits for those beneficiaries who assigned their tickets and those who did not. For DI beneficiaries, beneficiaries who assigned their tickets had lower average benefits during this period than those who did not assign their tickets. For SSI beneficiaries, benefits were essentially the same for beneficiaries who assigned or did not assign their Tickets.

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CHAPTER V

V.1 Cumulative Number of ENs, by Month
This line graph shows the cumulative number of ENs by month, including active ENs with Tickets and all active ENs. The count of ENs begins in January 2001 when the Program Manager began recruiting ENs and Ticket taking began with the official roll-out of TTW in February 2002. Both the cumulative number of ENs and the number taking tickets rise over time, although less than half of the ENs are have taken a Ticket. There is essentially no increase in the number of ENs and the number of ENs taking Tickets from February 2004 to the end of the period covered in the graph, June 2004.

V.2 Number of EN Terminations, by Month
This bar graph shows the number of EN terminations by month. Since May 2002, terminations ranged from one to five a month, although they rose to a high of 10 in December 2003 before falling again in early 2004.

V.3 Cumulative Payments to ENs
This bar graph shows cumulative payments to ENs in Phase 1, 2, and 3 states by month; the payments rose from $0 in May 2002 to approximately $900,000 in July 2004, and the majority of payments were made to ENs in Phase 1 states in all months

V.4 Payments to ENs by Month
This bar graph shows payments to ENs by month. Payments rose from May 2002 to July 2004 for Phase 1 ENs, with payments to Phase 2 and Phase 3 ENs showing up in January of 2003 and January of 2004. Payments to Phase 2 and 3 ENs make up a minority of payments in each month.

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CHAPTER VI

VI.1 SSA Beneficiaries As A Percentage of All SVRA Case Closures FY 1997-2003
This line graph shows SSA beneficiaries as a percentage of all SVRA case closures from FY 1997 to 2003. For states in each TTW Phase, this percentage increased steadily over the seven years shown.

VI.2 SSA Claims Allowed and SSA Payments to SVRAs Under the Traditional Payment Program, by Year
This graph shows both the number of SVRA cases for which SSA made a payment and the total value of those payments for each year from 1983 to 2004. Both claims allowed and total reimbursement costs generally rose until 2002 when both cases for which payments were made and the dollar value of payments dropped by a third (from $120 million in 2002 to $80 million in 2003-2004.

VI.3 Total SSA Payments to SVRAs and ENs
This bar graph shows total SSA payments to SVRAs and ENs from FY 1999 to FY 2004. Payments to ENs made up a barely noticeably portion of the total payments which were approximately $80 million in 2003 and 2004.

VI.4 Percentage of Competitively Employed SSA Cases Vs. Non-SSA Cases FY 1997-2003
This graph has two lines that indicate the percentage of cases that SVRAs close to competitive employment among SSA beneficiaries and among other SVRA participants. The line showing the rate of competitive employment for non-SSA cases is consistently higher than the line for SSA cases, typically be at least 5 percentage points. The percentage of SSA cases closed to competitive employment peaked in 2000 and fells sharply afterwards, while the percentage for non-SSA cases remained relatively constant.

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CHAPTER VIII

VIII.1 Summary of Core EN Activities in Ticket to Work
This flowchart lays out core EN activities in TTW, from outreach, to intake, to when the beneficiary assigns a Ticket to an EN, to the initial receipt of services, to the point at which the beneficiary works enough to generate a first payment, to follow-up services, payment tracking, and finally to when the EN receives payment.

VIII.2 Percentage of Tickets Generating Payment in Each Month Among Tickets That Generate at Least One Payment
This line graph shows the percentage of Tickets generating a payment in each month among Tickets that generate at least one payment, where months are measured from the month of Ticket assignment. For DI/concurrent beneficiaries, this percentage starts at 20% for the month of assignment, rises to about 30% for 3 to 6 months afterwards, and slowly decreases steadily after month 6 to less than 15% by month 23. For SSI beneficiaries, the percentage spikes to over 50% by month 3, drops sharply to 35% by month 6, and falls relatively steadily to about 10% by month 23.

VIII.3 Percentage of Tickets Assigned in the Second Year After TTW Rollout that Generate Any Payment in Months 0-11 that Generate Payment in Each Month
This line graph shows the percentage of Tickets assigned in the second year after TTW rollout that generated any payment in their first year of assignment, by month. For SSI beneficiaries, the percentage rose quickly in the first few months, peaked at months 3 and 4, and then fell steadily to just over 10% at month 23. For DI/concurrent beneficiaries, the percentage of Tickets assigned in the second year after TTW rollout that generated any payment in their first year of assignment rose much slower over the first few months, peaking at just over 30% in months 3 and 6, then falling slowly to just over 10% at month 23.

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CHAPTER IX

IX.1 Ticket-eligible Beneficiaries in AOI Groups 1 and 2, March 2004
This pie chart shows Ticket-eligible beneficiaries in AOI Groups 1 and 2 as of March 2004; 49% need ongoing support, 5% need accommodations, and all others make up 46% of the group.

IX.2 Distribution of Assigned Tickets for Beneficiaries Who Need Ongoing Support and Who Need High-Cost Accommodations, March 2004
This pie chart shows the distribution of assigned Tickets for beneficiaries who needed ongoing support and for those who needed high-cost accommodations as of March 2004; 49% of Tickets were assigned to those who needed ongoing support, 12% were assigned to those who needed accommodations, and 39% were assigned to all others.

IX.3 Earnings of Beneficiaries with Any Earnings in the Year Prior to Ticket Eligibility
This bar chart shows earnings of beneficiaries with any earnings in the year before they were eligible for TTW. The overwhelming majority had earnings under $15,000 (25-30% had earnings under $1000), while only 15-20% earned $15,000 or more.