Exhibit II.1 Program Characteristics of 2004 NBS Respondents at Interview

Program Characteristics of 2004 NBS Respondents at Interview, consists of four bar charts. The first chart shows the percent of the sample of NBS respondents who were SSI-only (31 percent), concurrent (16 percent) and DI-only (53 percent). The second chart shows the distribution of months since the beneficiary’s initial Social Security award. Four percent of beneficiaries were in the category of having an initial award less than 24 months ago, 20 percent were in the category of 24 to 59 months ago, 23 percent were in the category of 60 to 119 months ago, and 53 percent were in the category of 120 months ago or more. The third chart shows the monthly Social Security benefit amount (including federal and state supplement). Most respondents (63 percent) received $500 to $1,000 a month. 25 percent received more than $1,000 and 12 percent received less than $500. The fourth and final chart shows monthly non-SSA cash and near-cash benefit amounts. Most respondents had no cash benefits (65 percent), 18 percent had from $1 to $199, 7 percent had $200 to $500, and 10 percent had more than $500. (back to Exhibit II.1 )

Exhibit II.2 Sociodemographic Characteristics of Beneficiaries

Sociodemographic Characteristics of Beneficiaries, consists of seven bar charts. The first chart shows ages of the beneficiaries. Most people were 40 to 54 years old (39 percent), or over 55 (also 39 percent); 17 percent were age 25 to 39, while 5 percent were age 18 to 24. The second chart shows racial characteristics. 71 percent of the beneficiaries were white, 22 percent were black, six percent were of another race. 11 percent of the sample identified their ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino. The third chart shows the gender of respondents—the sample was equal parts male and female. The fourth chart shows education. 42 percent of beneficiaries had not completed high school, 35 percent had high school diplomas only, and 23 percent had education beyond high school. The fifth chart shows marital status. There were an approximately even percentage of people in the following three categories: (1) never married; (2) divorced, separated, or widowed; and (3) married. The sixth chart shows living arrangements. Almost half of the respondents were living with a spouse or other relative, with no children (49 percent); the next most common living arrangement was living alone or with unrelated others (36 percent). Seven percent were unmarried and living with their own children; eight percent lived with a spouse and children. The seventh and last chart shows income as a percentage of the federal poverty level. Almost half of the beneficiaries had income below the federal poverty level. 38 percent had income between 100 to 299 percent of the poverty level. 13 percent had an income of 300 percent of the federal poverty level or more. (back to Exhibit II.2 )

Exhibit II.3 Age at Disability Onset and Most Prevalent Self-Reported Conditions Causing Activity Limitations

Age at Disability Onset and Most Prevalent Self-Reported Conditions Causing Activity Limitations, and consists of three bar graphs. The first graph shows the distribution of age at onset of disability. 32 percent of people had an onset age between 40 and 54. About one-quarter of the respondents had an age of onset younger than 18, and one-quarter experienced onset between age 25 to 39. The age 18 to 24 category and the age 55 and up category each included about 10 percent of the respondents. The second graph shows the conditions causing activity limitations. The largest category was musculoskeletal at 36 percent; then other at 33 percent; mental illness at 31 percent; diseases of the circulatory system at 24 percent; endocrine or nutrition disorders at 16 percent; diseases of the nervous system at 15 percent; injury or poisoning, and diseases of the respiratory system at 10 percent each; sensory disorders at 9 percent, and mental retardation at 7 percent. Five percent said they had no condition limiting their activities. The third and last chart shows the number of conditions causing a limitation. 36 percent had two limitations, 33 percent had one, 18 percent had three, 9 percent had four or more, while, as mentioned previously, 5 percent had no conditions. (back to Exhibit II.3 )

Exhibit II.5 Percent of Beneficiaries Who Have Difficulty with a Given Number of ADLs/IADLs

Percent of Beneficiaries Who Have Difficulty with a Given Number of ADLs/IADLs, consists of a bar graph of the number of ADLs/IADLs. 28 percent reported no difficulties, 27 percent had four or more, 17 percent had one, 16 percent had two, and 12 percent had three. (back to Exhibit II.5 )

Exhibit II.6 Prevalence of Difficulty Performing Specific Activities

Prevalence of Difficulty Performing Specific Activities, consists of a single bar graph. The most commonly reported problem was difficulty in “walking three blocks, climbing 10 steps, standing for one hour and/or crouching,” at 84 percent. The next most common difficulty was in “grasping, reaching, and/or lifting 10 pounds,” at 67 percent. Additionally, 65 percent of respondents reported sensory difficulties, 59 percent of people had difficulty coping with stress, 55 percent had trouble concentrating, 47 percent had trouble getting around outside the home, 38 percent had problems preparing meals, 37 percent had difficulty shopping for personal items, 29 percent experienced difficulty bathing or dressing, 26 percent had problems getting along with others, 23 percent reported difficulty getting around inside the house, and 15 percent had trouble eating. (back to Exhibit II.6 )

Exhibit II.7 Current General Health and Current Health Compared to Last Year consists of two bar charts. The first shows that 47 percent of people rated their health good or fair

Current General Health and Current Health Compared to Last Year consists of two bar charts. The first shows that 47 percent of people rated their health good or fair, 43 percent rated it poor or very poor, and 10 percent rated their health excellent or very good. The second chart shows that 43 percent rated their health as about the same as last year, while 41 percent rated it much or somewhat worse, and 16 percent rated it much or somewhat better. (back to Exhibit II.7 )

Exhibit II.8 Beneficiary Employment

Beneficiary Employment, consists of a single bar chart. It shows that 87 percent of respondents said they had ever worked for pay, 18 percent reported recent work activity, 13 percent had worked in 2003, 9 percent were employed at the time of the interview, and 6 percent said they had looked for work during the previous four weeks. (back to Exhibit II.8 )

Exhibit II.10 Expectations about Future Employment

Expectations about Future Employment, consists of a bar chart. It shows that 30 percent of respondents reported personal goals that included work and career advancement. 20 percent saw themselves working for pay in the next year and 26 percent anticipated working in the next five years. 7 percent saw themselves working enough to stop receiving disabilities benefits in the next year; 15 percent in the next five years. (back to Exhibit II.10 )

Exhibit II.11 Selected Reasons for Using Services Among All Beneficiaries Who Used Services in 2003

Selected Reasons for Using Services Among All Beneficiaries Who Used Services in 2003, consists of a bar chart. The most common reason reported for using services was to improve health (70 percent), next was to improve the ability to perform daily activities (25 percent), next was to find a job or get a better job (9 percent). Only 1 percent said they used services to increase income. (back to Exhibit II.11 )

Exhibit II.12 Types of Services Used in 2003 Among Service Users

Types of Services Used in 2003 Among Service Users, consists of a bar chart showing that 69 percent of the respondents used personal counseling or group therapy; 29 percent used occupational, physical, or speech therapy; 29 percent used medical procedure services; 23 percent used special equipment or devices; 22 percent used training or advice about modifying a job, or on the job training; 20 percent used work assessment or help in finding a job; and 5 percent used other services. (back to Exhibit II.12 )

Exhibit III.1 Ticket Mailings

Ticket Mailings, by Month and Phase (in thousands), consists of a stacked bar chart. The chart shows that most Phase 1 states had their Tickets mailed between February 2002 and October 2002. The number of Phase 1 Tickets mailed out totaled about 250,000 in February 2002, then increased somewhat sharply, reaching a peak at 750,000 around July 2002. The number of Phase 1 Tickets mailed sharply declined after July 2002, to about 150,000Tickets mailed per month between August 2002 and October 2002. Phase 1 Tickets continued to be mailed at a rate of about 30,000 per month through December 2004. Phase 2 Tickets were first mailed in November 2002; additional Phase 2 Tickets were not mailed again until February 2003. From February 2003 to September 2003, about 300,000 Phase 2 Tickets were mailed per month. From October 2003 to December 2004, approximately 30,000 Phase 2 Tickets were mailed per month. Phase 3 Tickets were first mailed in December 2003, though none were mailed in January 2004. Between February 2004 and September 2004, approximately 300,000 Phase 3 Tickets were mailed per month. Between October 2004 and December 2004, about 30,000 Phase 3 Tickets were mailed each month. (back to Exhibit III.1 )

Exhibit III.2 Participation Rate

Participation Rate, by Months Since Rollout Start and Phase, consists of a line chart with three lines. It shows the percentage of participation in TTW by number of months since rollout began. For Phase 1 participants, the participation rate started at approximately 0.05 percent, spiked after one month to 0.3 percent, dipped down to 0.2 percent, then steadily increased to 1.4 percent 34 months after rollout began. For Phase 2 participants, participation started at approximately 0.05 percent and steadily increased to 0.9 percent 24 months after rollout began. For Phase 3 participants, the participation rate started at 0.3 percent, spiked to 0.6 percent in the first month, dipped back to 0.4 percent the following month, and stayed level at 0.4 percent until about 10 months when the rate began increasing slightly to a peak of 0.5 percent at 14 months after rollout began. (back to Exhibit III.2 )

Exhibit III.3 Participation Rates

Participation Rates, by Months Since Rollout Start, Phase, and Provider Type, shows a line chart with six lines. The lines compare participation rates by provider type in each of the three phases. The EN participation rates in all phases remain relatively constant at about 0.05 percent, increasing slightly to almost 0.1 percent at 34 months after rollout began. The SVRA participation rates change more dramatically. The Phase 1 SVRA participation rates start at approximately 0.07 percent, sharply increase to 0.3 percent, dip down to 1.8 percent at 3 months after rollout, then increase steadily, reaching a peak of 1.3 percent at 34 months after rollout. The Phase 2 SVRA participants begin at 0.05 percent and then increase steadily to a peak of 0.8 percent at 25 months after rollout. The Phase 3 SVRA participants begin at approximately 0.25 percent, spike to 0.6 percent in the next month, then dip back to 0.4 percent and remain relatively constant until a slight increase between 10 and 14 months after rollout, reaching a peak of 0.45 percent. (back to Exhibit III.3 )

Exhibit III.4 Percentage of Beneficiary Entrants to SVRA Services Who Assigned a Ticket by Phase and SVRA Entry Month

Percentage of Beneficiary Entrants to SVRA Services Who Assigned a Ticket by Phase and SVRA Entry Month, consists of a line chart. The horizontal axis shows the SVRA Entry Month Relative to Rollout Start (range of –132 to 24), and the vertical axis shows the percent that assigned their Ticket (range of 0 to 50 percent). Phase 1, 2, and 3 states all show a similar trend of a gradual increase in the percentage of Tickets assigned from –132 months to –60 months. Phase 1 states’ initial assignment rate is approximately 8 percent, Phase 2’s is 3 percent, and Phase 3’s is 1 percent. At around –60 months, the assignment rates spike for all three lines, then decrease. The Phase 1 states spike to 20 percent and the Phase 3 states to 8 percent while the Phase 2 states exhibit the biggest change, increasing from 8 to 21 percent. The assignment rates drop for all three lines shortly after the spike and then begin increasing again. The Phase 1 and 3 states increase more gradually while the Phase 2 states spike to a high of a 40 percent assignment at 12 months. (back to Exhibit III.4 )

Exhibit III.5 Percentage of In-Use Tickets Assigned Under the Traditional Payment System

Percentage of In-Use Tickets Assigned Under the Traditional Payment System, by Months Since Rollout Start and Phase, consists of a line chart with three lines, comparing Phase 1, Phase 2, and Phase 3 states in the rate of Ticket assignments. The Phase 1 states’ assignment rate begins at 100 percent at 1 month after rollout. The rate then drops sharply to approximately 70 percent, spikes again to 84 percent, dips down to 77 percent, and then begins gradually increasing to reach 85 percent at 34 months. The Phase 2 states start at 76 percent, dip to 67 percent, then begin gradually increasing to reach 80 percent at 25 months. The Phase 3 states begin with an assignment rate of 88 percent, increase slightly to 91 percent in the next month, then gradually decrease to 81 percent at 13 months after rollout. (back to Exhibit III.5 )

Exhibit III.6 Participation Rates for New Payment Systems

Participation Rates for New Payment Systems, by Months Since Rollout Start and Phase, consists of a line chart with six lines. The lines show participation rates by type of payment system and phase. The milestone-outcome lines for all phases show the same general pattern of a consistent increase from start to end. The milestone-outcome, Phase 1 line starts at approximately 0.01 percent and ends at 0.17 percent at 34 months after rollout. The milestone-outcome, Phase 2 line starts at 0.01 percent and gradually increases to 0.13 percent at 25 months after rollout. The milestone-outcome, Phase 3 line starts at 0.025 percent and ends at 0.08 percent at 13 months after rollout. The outcome-only lines all gradually increase, but at a much slower rate than the milestone-outcome lines. All the outcome-only lines start at approximately 0.01 percent. Outcome-only, Phase 1 ends at 0.025 percent at 34 months after rollout. Outcome-only, Phase 2 ends at 0.025 percent at 25 months after rollout. Outcome-only, Phase 3 ends at 0.02 percent 13 months after rollout. (back to Exhibit III.6 )

Exhibit III.7 Net Deactivations

Net Deactivations, by Months Since Rollout Start, Provider Type, and Phase, shows a line graph with six lines representing Phase 1, 2, and 3 SVRAs and ENs. The graph maps the percent of provider deactivation per month since the start of TTW rollout. Phase 1 ENs generally had the highest percentage of provider deactivations, from just less than 3 percent 6 months after program rollout to a high of 6 percent 12 months after rollout; after that, deactivations drop to 2 percent and fluctuate between 1 and 2 percent until 34 months after rollout. Phase 2 ENs tended to have the second-highest percentage of net deactivations, averaging 2 percent deactivations from 6 months post-rollout to 24 months post-rollout when data end; from 16 to 20 months post-rollout, the Phase 2 ENs had a higher percentage of deactivations than Phase 1 ENs. Phase 3 ENs show data for only 13 months, but generally decline from 2 percent deactivations at 6 months to below 1 percent at 10 months, thereafter rising to just over 2 percent deactivations. SVRA deactivation rates in all phases hover just over 0 percent, with the exception of a small bump in deactivations of Phase 2 SVRAs 23 months post-rollout. (back to Exhibit III.7 )

Exhibit III.8 Ticket Participation Rates by State

Ticket Participation Rates by State, Provider Type, and Payment Type, December 2004, consists of two bar graphs showing Ticket participation rates in each state. The first bar graph indicates the percentage of Ticket participants assigning their Ticket to each provider type, with a long black bar indicating the SVRAs and a white tip indicating the ENs. Of the Phase 1 states, Vermont has the largest participation rate at nearly 5 percent of beneficiaries, all of whom are assigned to SVRAs; in descending order of participation rates, the rest of the Phase 1 states are Delaware (just under 3 percent), Wisconsin, Illinois (2 percent), Oklahoma, New York, Iowa, South Carolina, Florida (just under 1 percent), Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, and Massachusetts (0.5 percent). Of those, Wisconsin and Arizona have the most Tickets assigned to ENs. Among Phase 2 states, South Dakota has the largest participation rate at just under 3 percent (all Tickets assigned to SVRAs); in descending order of participation rate, the other Phase 2 states are Michigan, Kansas, Indiana, Virginia, Louisiana, Connecticut, Missouri (1 percent), Tennessee, Nevada, Montana, District of Columbia, Georgia, Alaska, Mississippi, New Jersey (0.5 percent), Arkansas, Kentucky, New Mexico, North Dakota, and New Hampshire (0.25 percent). Of those, District of Columbia has the most ENs at nearly 0.5 percent while Tennessee and Nevada have the next-largest EN participation rate, roughly 0.2 percent. Idaho has the highest participation rate of the Phase 3 states at 1.5 percent, followed by (in descending order) Utah and Nebraska (under 1 percent); Ohio, Washington, Maine, Pennsylvania, Alabama, California, Virgin Islands, Maryland, Minnesota (0.5 percent), Texas, North Carolina, West Virginia, Wyoming, Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Puerto Rico (0.1 percent). Of those, the Virgin Islands (slightly over 0.5 percent) and Puerto Rico (0.1 percent) have exclusively EN providers; Washington, California, and Texas all have around 0.1 percent EN providers as well.

The second bar graph shows TTW provider participation rates by payment type: traditional, outcome-only, and milestone-outcome. The traditional payment system dominated in most states. Of the Phase 1 states, the notable exceptions are as follows: one-third of Vermont’s payments were outcome-only, and about one-sixth of Delaware’s payments were milestone-outcome, as were about 50 percent of Oklahoma’s payments, one-fourth of Arizona’s, and one-third of Massachusetts’s. The other states had small percentages of their overall payments in the alternative payment systems. Among Phase 2 states, most used the traditional payment system, with the notable exceptions of Indiana, where half of payments were milestone-outcome payments; Louisiana, where about a third of payments were milestone-outcome payments; Connecticut, where about half of payments were outcome-only payments; District of Columbia, where about half of payments were milestone-outcome payments; Maine, where about one-fourth of payments were milestone-outcome payments; Virgin Islands, where all payments were milestone-outcome payments; Texas, where half of payments were milestone-outcome payments; and Puerto Rico, where all payments were milestone-outcome payments.(back to Exhibit III.8 )

Exhibit IV.1 Extent of Participants’ Self-Reported Knowledge About TTW Before They Started to Participate

Extent of Participants’ Self-Reported Knowledge About TTW Before They Started to Participate, 2003 Cohort, consists of a pie chart. Almost 50 percent of respondents said they knew nothing about Ticket to Work before they started to participate, while 18.4 percent said they knew some, and 18 percent said they knew a little. 13.7 percent said they knew a lot. (back to Exhibit IV.1 )

Exhibit IV.2 Participants’ Perspectives on Ease of Getting TTW Information

Participants’ Perspectives on Ease of Getting TTW Information, 2003 Cohort, consists of a pie chart. 40.3 percent reported that they found it very easy to get information on TTW, 28.3 percent said it was somewhat easy, 19.4 percent said it was not very easy, 8.8 percent said it was not at all easy, and 3.3 percent said they don’t know. (back to Exhibit IV.2 )

Exhibit IV.3 Usefulness of Information About Available ENs As Reported by Participants Who Obtained Any Such Information

Usefulness of Information About Available ENs As Reported by Participants Who Obtained Any Such Information, shows a pie chart. The greatest number, 40.4 percent of participants who obtained information about available ENs, said the information was somewhat useful, 20.4 percent said it was not very useful, 19.8 percent said it was not at all useful, 19.5 percent said it was very useful. (back to Exhibit IV.3 )

Exhibit IV.12 Participants’ Perspectives on How Successful They Have been in Reaching Their Work Goals Since Participating in TTW

Participants’ Perspectives on How Successful They Have been in Reaching Their Work Goals Since Participating in TTW, consists of a pie chart. 35.9 percent said they have been somewhat successful in reaching their work goals since participating in Ticket to Work, 31.3 percent said not at all successful, 17.8 percent said very successful, and 15 percent said not very successful. (back to Exhibit IV.12 )

Exhibit IV.13 Participants’ Overall Satisfaction with the Ticket To Work Program

Participants’ Overall Satisfaction with the Ticket To Work Program, consists of a pie chart. 38 percent said they were somewhat satisfied with the Ticket to Work Program, 30 percent said they were very satisfied, 18 percent said they were not at all satisfied, and 14 percent said they were not very satisfied. (back to Exhibit IV.13 )

Exhibit V.1 Service Use by Beneficiaries and TTW Participants in Phase 1 States

Service Use by Beneficiaries and TTW Participants in Phase 1 States, 2003, consists of three bar charts. The first shows that participants were more likely to use services than beneficiaries (57 percent compared to 34 percent, which was statistically significant). The next chart shows that Ticket participants who had a SVRA as their provider type were more likely to use services than those who had an EN (59 percent to 48 percent, which is statistically significant). The last chart shows that Ticket participants who had an outcome-only payment system were more likely to use services than those using traditional payment systems, and participants using milestone-outcome only system were least likely to use services (61 percent, 48 percent, and 58 percent, respectively, milestone-outcome was statistically significant when compared to the traditional system). (back to Exhibit V.1 )

Exhibit V.2 Selected Reasons for Using Services Among Subgroups of Phase 1 Beneficiaries Who Used Services in 2003 (Percentage Reporting Reason)

Selected Reasons for Using Services Among Subgroups of Phase 1 Beneficiaries Who Used Services in 2003 (Percentage Reporting Reason), consists of four bar charts, all comparing the following subgroups: all Phase 1 service users, all TTW services users, participants assigned to an EN, and participants assigned to a SVRA. The first chart shows that all Phase 1 service users were more likely to use services to improve health (69 percent) than the other three subgroups (each about 45 percent). This difference was statistically significant. The second chart shows respondents who said they used services to improve their ability to perform daily activities. There were no statistically significant differences (all Phase 1 service users, 29 percent, all TTW service users, 23 percent, those assigned to an EN, 16 percent, and those assigned to a SVRA, 24 percent). The third chart shows respondents who said they used services to find a job or get a better job. Only 8 percent of all Phase 1 service users gave this reason, while 54 percent of TTW service users did. This is a statistically significant difference from all Phase 1 service users. 47 percent of those assigned to an EN, and 55 percent of those assigned to an gave this reason. The fourth bar chart shows people who said they used services to increase their income. Only 1 percent of all Phase 1 service users gave this reason, while between 6 and 7 percent of the other subgroups gave this reason. The difference between all Phase 1 service users and all TTW service users was statistically significant for this response. (back to Exhibit V.2 )

Exhibit V.3 Service Types Used in 2003 Among Service Users in Phase 1 States

Service Types Used in 2003 Among Service Users in Phase 1 States, by TTW Participant Status and TTW Provider Type (Percentage Reporting Type), consists of seven bar charts. The charts show the types of services used by the following subgroups: all Phase 1 service users, all TTW service users, all participants assigned to an EN, and all participants assigned to a SVRA. There were no significant differences between the subgroups in who used personal counseling/group therapy; occupational, physical or speech therapy; medical procedures; and other procedures. A significantly larger percentage of all Phase 1 service users reported using special equipment or devices, when compared to Ticket participants (25 percent to 17 percent). Additionally, a significantly larger percentage of Ticket participant service-users reported using training, on-the-job training, or advice about modifying their job, when compared to all Phase 1 beneficiaries (67 percent to 24 percent). This was also true of a larger number of SVRA-assigned participants, when compared to participants assigned to an EN (69 percent compared to 50 percent). Additionally, a significantly larger portion of Ticket participants used work assessment or help to find a job, when compared to all Phase 1 beneficiaries (62 percent compared to 22 percent). (back to Exhibit V.3 )

Exhibit V.6 Percent of Phase 1 Beneficiaries Enrolled in School and Working Toward a Degree or License in 2003

Percent of Phase 1 Beneficiaries Enrolled in School and Working Toward a Degree or License in 2003, by Selected Subgroup, consists of two bar charts. The first shows the percent enrolled in school at the time of interview. There is a significant difference in this variable between those assigned to SVRAs and those assigned to ENs (16 percent and 7 percent, respectively), and between Ticket participants compared to all Phase 1 beneficiaries (15 percent compared to 3 percent). Among those in school, there were no significant differences in the percent of those working toward a degree or license, when comparing Ticket participants (89 percent) to Phase 1 beneficiaries (73 percent), and EN-assigned participants (92 percent) to SVRA-assigned participants (89 percent). (back to Exhibit V.6 )

Exhibit V.9 Service Use Among Beneficiaries by Phase and TTW Participation Status (Percentages)

Service Use Among Beneficiaries by Phase and TTW Participation Status (Percentages), consists of a bar chart. It shows that 57 percent of Phase 1 TTW participants used services, compared to 33 percent of Phase 1 nonparticipants. Overall, 34 percent of all Phase 1 beneficiaries, 29 percent of all Phase 2 beneficiaries, and 30 percent of all Phase 3 beneficiaries used services. (back to Exhibit V.9 )

Exhibit V.10 Selected Reasons for Using Services

Selected Reasons for Using Services, by Phase (Percentage Reporting Reason), consists of several bar charts. The charts show the percent of Phase 1, 2, and 3 beneficiaries that reported different reasons for using services. There was little difference among the phases. About 70 percent in each phase reported they used services to improve their health, about 9 percent reported they used them to find a job or get a better job, and about 2 percent said they used services to increase income. There was a slightly bigger difference between the phases in those who gave the reason as “to improve the ability to do daily activities.” 29 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries said this was a reason to use services, compared to 24 percent of Phase 2, and 21 percent of Phase 3. beneficiaries. (back to Exhibit V.10 )

Exhibit V.11 Types of Services Used in 2003, by Phase (Percentage Reporting Service Type)

Types of Services Used in 2003, by Phase (Percentage Reporting Service Type), consists of bar charts with the types of services used in 2003, by Phase. 70 percent of Phase 3, 65 percent of Phase 2, and 73 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries used personal counseling and/or group therapy. 41 percent of Phase 3, 37 percent of Phase 2, and 37 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries used occupational, physical and/or speech therapy. 22 percent of Phase 3, 23 percent of Phase 2, and 25 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries used special equipment or devices. 32 percent of Phase 3, 30 percent of Phase 2, and 25 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries used medical procedures. 23 percent of Phase 3 beneficiaries, 19 percent of Phase 2, and 24 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries used training, on-the-job training and/or advice about modifying a job. 21 percent of Phase 3, 18 percent of Phase 2, and 22 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries, used work assessment/help in finding a job. 4 percent of Phase 3; 5 percent of Phase 2; and 4 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries used other services. back to Exhibit V.11 )

Exhibit VI.1 Employment Rates for Selected Subgroups of Phase 1 Beneficiaries

Employment Rates for Selected Subgroups of Phase 1 Beneficiaries, Percent Working at Interview, consists of a single bar chart. Ticket participants were more likely to be working than Phase 1 beneficiaries (32.4 percent compared to 9.8 percent, a significant difference). 11.4 percent of Phase 1 non-TTW service users were working. 32.4 percent of TTW participants were working. 32.7 percent of participants assigned to a SVRA, and 30.6 percent of participants assigned to an EN were working. (back to Exhibit VI.1 )

Exhibit VI.4 Months at Current Main Job Among Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries

Months at Current Main Job Among Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries, Average Months at Job, consists of a bar chart. Phase 1 beneficiaries had a higher average number of months at their job than Ticket participants (52 percent vs. 26 percent). This difference was statistically significant. Additionally, TTW participants who assigned their Ticket to a SVRA had a higher average number of months at their job than those who assigned their Ticket to an EN (28 percent to 17 percent). This difference was also statistically significant. (back to Exhibit VI.4 )

Exhibit VI.6 Sheltered and Self-Employment Among Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries

Sheltered and Self-Employment Among Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries, consists of two bar charts. The first graph shows the percentage of working people in sheltered employment by subgroup. There was a significant difference in this variable between Ticket participants assigned to ENs (23 percent) versus participants assigned to SVRAs (39 percent). There was a smaller difference between all Phase 1 beneficiaries (39 percent) and Ticket participants (37 percent). The second chart shows the percentage of working people who were self-employed, by subgroup. There were no significant differences between those assigned to ENs (8 percent) and those assigned to SVRAS (11 percent), and there were there no significant differences between all Phase 1 beneficiaries (15 percent) and Ticket participants (11 percent). (back to Exhibit VI.6 )

Exhibit VI.8 Use of Special Equipment or Assistance at Work by Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries

Use of Special Equipment or Assistance at Work by Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries, consists of two bar charts. The first chart shows the percentage of beneficiaries, by subgroup, using personal assistance at work. There was a significant difference between the use of personal assistance when comparing participants assigned to ENs (8 percent) versus participants assigned to SVRAs (26 percent). There was no significant difference between Phase 1 beneficiaries and Ticket participants (both were 24 percent). The second chart shows the percent of beneficiaries using special equipment at work, indicating no significant differences between subgroups. Ticket participants, those assigned to ENs, and those assigned to SVRAs all used special equipment at work at a rate of 20 percent while 26 percent of all Phase 1 beneficiaries used special equipment at work. (back to Exhibit VI.8 )

Exhibit VI.9 Employer-Provided Accommodations Among Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries

Employer-Provided Accommodations Among Working Phase 1 Beneficiaries, shows a bar chart. The chart compares all TTW participants to all Phase 1 beneficiaries. It shows that 54 percent of Ticket participants said that their employer made at least one accommodation while 58 percent of all beneficiaries reported the same. The second half of the chart shows the types of accommodations among those receiving accommodations, with 75 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries and 73 percent of Ticket participants reporting that their employer arranged for a co-worker/others to assist him or her. In addition, 46 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries and 36 percent of Ticket participants reported changes to their work tasks, and 45 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries and 48 percent of Ticket participants noted changes to their work schedule. At the same time, 37 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries and 35 percent of Ticket participants reported changes to the physical work environment while 12 percent of both Phase 1 beneficiaries and Ticket participants said that they were provided with special equipment. (back to Exhibit VI.9 )

Exhibit VI.10 Changes to the Workplace Still Needed

Changes to the Workplace Still Needed, According to Phase 1 Beneficiaries, shows a bar chart. The exhibit indicates that 8.3 percent of Phase 1 beneficiaries, 4.7 percent of TTW participants, 7.2 percent of participants assigned to ENs, and 4.3 percent of participants assigned to SVRAs reported the need for changes to the workplace. (back to Exhibit VI.10 )

Exhibit VIII.1 EN Enrollment Over Time

EN Enrollment Over Time, shows a line graph comparing the number of ENs enrolled in each month from January 2001 to July 2005 compared to the number of ENs with one or more accepted Tickets. The number of ENs increases linearly as of June 2001, but the number of ENs with one or more accepted Tickets does not increase until February 2008 and then at a slower rate than the total number of ENs participating in TTW. (back to Exhibit VIII.1 )

Exhibit VIII.2 EN Terminations Over Time

EN Terminations Over Time, shows a bar graph that maps, by month, the number of ENs who terminated their contracts between May 2002 and July 2005. From May 2002 through September 2003, between 0 and 5 ENs terminated a contract each month. Between October 2003 and April 2004, between 6 and 10 ENs terminated a contract each month, with the exception of January and February, when only 1 or 2 ENs terminated a contract. From May 2004 through December 2004, no contracts were terminated, except for 1 in July. In January 2005, 1 EN terminated a contract, and in February 2005, 18 ENs terminated a contract. No EN terminated a contract from March 2005 through July 2005. (back to Exhibit VIII.2 )

Exhibit VIII.4 Tickets Mailed by County

Tickets Mailed by County, is a map of the United States on which the number of Tickets mailed to beneficiaries is indicated by the darkness of the color shading in each county. Most of the counties on the East Coast were mailed 1,001 to 10,000 Tickets, but a few counties, especially those near major cities such as Boston and New York, were mailed 10,001 to 250,000 Tickets. Counties in the middle of the country were mailed 1 to 100 or 101 to 1,000 Tickets. Counties on the West Coast were mailed the highest density of Tickets, with most counties receiving 1,001 to 10,000 Tickets and many in southern California, southwest Arizona, and those surrounding Seattle and Portland receiving 10,001 to 250,000 Tickets. Most Alaskan counties received 101 to 1,000 Tickets, and Hawaiian counties received 1,001 to 10,000 Tickets. (back to Exhibit VIII.4 )

Exhibit VIII.5 ENs Accepting Tickets by County

ENs Accepting Tickets by County, is a map of the United States on which the shading of counties indicates the presence of at least one EN accepting Tickets. Most shading is concentrated on the East and West coasts, around state capitals and other major cities. Counties with an EN accepting Tickets are concentrated in California, Arizona, Washington, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland, Florida, and Hawaii and along the coast of Oregon, in the southern part of Nevada, and in southern sections of New York and Pennsylvania. The majority of counties west of the Mississippi and east of California has no ENs accepting at least one Ticket. (back to Exhibit VIII.5 )

Exhibit VIII.7 Payments to ENs by Month

Payments to ENs by Month, consists of a bar graph showing the dollar amount of payments made to ENs during months between May 2002 and July 2005, with ENs grouped by state phase. Phase 1 ENs began receiving payments by September 2002, but payments do not sum to $20,000 until March 2003. Very small payments to Phase 3 ENs began in April 2003 and to Phase 2 ENs in June 2003. Payments to Phase 1 ENs rise to around $50,000 in February 2004, September 2004, January 2005, and May 2005 but fall to around $30,000 in between those dates. Phase 2 ENs received payments in steadily increasing amounts from June 2003 onward, reaching $20,000 in February 2004, $30,000 in December 2004, and $60,000 in April 2005 and slowly declining thereafter. Phase 3 ENs follow a similar pattern of relatively steady increase from August 2004 onward, with a peak of around $40,000 in June 2005. (back to Exhibit VIII.7 )

Exhibit VIII.10 Processing Times for Payments and First Payments for Earnings Months

Processing Times for Payments and First Payments for Earnings Months, charts the cumulative percentage of payments paid to ENS against the number of months since the month that earnings occurred from March 2002 through June 2003. The graph has two lines, one for all payments and one for first payments. The cumulative percentage paid of all payments and first payments reaches 25 percent at about 4 months, 50 percent at about 7 months, and 75 percent at about 12 months. Cumulative percentages for first payments hit the milestones about two months later. (back to Exhibit VIII.10 )

Exhibit VIII.11 Processing Times for First Payments by Earnings Month Group

Processing Times for First Payments by Earnings Month Group, charts the cumulative percentage of payments paid to ENs against the number of months since the month that earnings occurred from March 2002 through June 2003. The graph compares earnings paid in each of three earnings month groups: March to June 2002, July to December 2002, and January to June 2003. The rate of cumulative percentage paid was roughly the same for earnings in March through June 2002 and July through December 2002, but slightly slower for earnings in January through June 2003. The line for the most recent earnings period is above the line for the middle period, which in turn is above the line for the first period; in other words, processing times for first payments have decreased. For instance, the line for the most recent period reaches 50 percent at month 7, whereas the line for the first period reaches that milestone at month 10. (back to Exhibit VIII.11 )

Exhibit VIII.12 Processing Times for COPP and Non–COPP Claims Paid

Processing Times for COPP and Non–COPP Claims Paid, November 2003 Through July 2005, shows the cumulative percentage of payments paid in months since earnings month. The cumulative percentage of COPP payments paid was higher than for non–COPP payments at any given month since the earnings month; that is, COPP payments are made more quickly. For instance, over 50 percent are paid by the third month, whereas non–COPP payments hit the 50 percent mark at six months. (back to Exhibit VIII.12 )

Exhibit XI.1 Claims Paid Under the Traditional System by Phase

Claims Paid Under the Traditional System by Phase, Fiscal Years 2001–2005, shows the logarithmic number of claims paid under the traditional system by phase and year between 2001 and 2005. For each phase, the number increases from 2001 to 2002, then drops for the rest of the period with two exceptions. Phase 1 states experienced an increase from 2003 to 2004 while Phase 2 states saw an increase from 2004 to 2005. (back to Exhibit XI.1 )

Exhibit XI.2 Traditional Payment Claims and Payment Amounts

Traditional Payment Claims and Payment Amounts, Fiscal Years 1983–2005, graphs the total number of traditional payment system claims allowed and total reimbursement costs by fiscal year. Both claims allowed and payments rose steadily from 1983 to 1990, dropped slightly and stabilized from 1991 to 1996, rose from 1996 to 1999, dropped until 2001, spiked in 2002, and dropped until 2005. Claims ranged from just over 2,000 in 1984 to a high of over 11,000 in 1999. Total reimbursement payments follow the same pattern, ranging from $5 million in 1984 to $135 million in 2002. (back to Exhibit XI.2 )

Exhibit XIII.1 Anticipated Impacts of TTW on Service Enrollment

Anticipated Impacts of TTW on Service Enrollment, Earnings, and Benefit, Amounts of Ticket-Eligible Beneficiaries, is a flow chart demonstrating the potential impacts of Ticket receipt on beneficiaries. A Ticket might lead to increased service enrollment, which might lead to higher earnings, which in turn might lead to reduced benefits. (back to Exhibit XIII.1 )

Exhibit XIII.4 Upper-Bound Impact Estimates on Total Service Enrollment for Ticket-Eligible Beneficiaries Age 18 to 57

Upper-Bound Impact Estimates on Total Service Enrollment for Ticket-Eligible Beneficiaries Age 18 to 57, by Age and Program Group, consists of two sets of three bar graphs illustrating estimated upper-bound impacts of TTW on service enrollment in Phase 1 states in 2002 for three beneficiary groups: DI-only, SSI-only, and concurrent. The first set of bar graphs shows the impacts on service enrollment; each graph presents the impact in percentage points for three beneficiary age groups: 18 to 39, 40 to 49, and 50 to 57. Among the DI-only beneficiaries, the estimated impact is 0.6 percentage point for beneficiaries age 18 through 39, 0.4 percentage point for beneficiaries age 40 through 49, and 0.2 percentage point for beneficiaries age 50 through 57. Among SSI-only beneficiaries, the estimated impact is 0.5 percentage point for beneficiaries age 1 through 39, 0.4 percentage point for beneficiaries age 40 through 49, and 0.2 percentage point for beneficiaries age 50 through 57. Among concurrent beneficiaries, the estimated impact is 0.5 percentage point for beneficiaries age 18 through 39, 0.4 percentage point for beneficiaries age 40 through 49, and 0.2 percentage point for beneficiaries age 50 through 57. All impact estimates are significant at the 0.01 level.The second set of bar graphs is based on the same results. For each beneficiary group, it shows the percentage enrollment for treatment and comparison groups, adjusted for differences in other factors. In all cases, the difference is particularly small relative to comparison group enrollment. (back to Exhibit XIII.4 )

Exhibit XIII.7 Sensitivity Tests of Total Service Enrollment Impact Models Applied to Pre-Ticket Cohorts

Sensitivity Tests of Total Service Enrollment Impact Models Applied to Pre-Ticket Cohorts, is a bar graph with three bars. The height of the bar for the Ticket cohort represents the impact estimate for service enrollment, 0.4 percentage point. The other two bars show the results from the same estimator applied to the 1998 and 1999 cohorts: –0.06 and –0.09 percentage points, respectively. (back to Exhibit XIII.7 )

Exhibit XIII.9 Sensitivity Tests of Earnings and Benefit Impact Models Applied to Pre-Ticket Cohorts

Sensitivity Tests of Earnings and Benefit Impact Models Applied to Pre-Ticket Cohorts, consists of two bar graphs, one for earnings and one for benefits. Each has three bars, one for the 2001 (i.e., Ticket) cohort and the others for two pre–TW cohorts, 1998 and 1999. The earnings graph shows that the estimate of the impact of TTW on earnings in the second year, based on the Ticket cohort, is $23 per beneficiary. The same estimates based on the 1998 and 1999 cohorts are higher: $33 and $30, respectively. For benefits, the impact estimate based on the Ticket cohort is $19 per beneficiary. The corresponding estimates based on the 1998 and 1999 cohorts are $20 and $15 per beneficiary, respectively. (back to Exhibit XIII.9 )

Exhibit XIV.3 Percent Generating First Payment for Beneficiaries Assigning Tickets Under the Milestone-Outcome System

Percent Generating First Payment for Beneficiaries Assigning Tickets Under the Milestone-Outcome System, by Months Since Assignment and Assignment Cohort, is a line graph that maps the percentage of beneficiaries who assign a Ticket under the milestone-outcome system and generate a payment against the number of months since Ticket assignment. All four cohorts showed a similar rate of increase in the percentage of beneficiaries generating payments as months pass since Ticket assignment, increasing roughly 3 to 4 percent every 6 months over the first 18 months, but declining to a slower rate thereafter. The first cohort, observed the longest, reaches 15.8 percent in the 37th month. (back to Exhibit XIV.3 )

Exhibit XIV.4 Percent Generating First Payment for Beneficiaries Who Assigned Their Ticket Under the Outcome-Only System

Percent Generating First Payment for Beneficiaries Who Assigned Their Ticket Under the Outcome-Only System, by Months Since Assignment and Assignment Cohort, is a line graph that, for four assignment cohorts, maps the percentage of those who assigned a Ticket under the outcome-only system and generated a payment against the number of months since Ticket assignment. No more than 2 percent of beneficiaries in any cohort had generated a payment before 10 months after Ticket assignment; this continued to be true until 18 months after Ticket assignment in cohort 2. Cohort 2 increased the percentage with payment much more slowly than other cohorts over time. For all cohorts, the percentage of beneficiaries with payment increased at similar rates. The percentage for Cohort 1, observed the longest, continued to increase, reaching a peak of 8 percent at 36 months after assignment. (back to Exhibit XIV.4 )

Exhibit XIV.5 Number of Payments for Assignments with Payments

Number of Payments for Assignments with Payments, by Payment System and Assignment Cohort, consists of two line graphs depicting the number of payments generated through July 2005 for those assignments that generated at least one payment, the first for milestone-outcome payment and the second for outcome-only payment. For each of the four assignment cohorts, the exhibit shows the percentage of Ticket assignments with payments generating at least the number of payments indicated on the horizontal axis. For milestone-outcome payments, the percentage generating five or more payments is 50 percent or less—just 22 percent for the most recent cohort, which has necessarily been observed for the shortest period. For the first cohort, observed the longest, over 30 percent of the assignments with payments had generated 12 or more payments. For outcome-only payments, the percentage generating at least five payments ranges from about 70 percent for the third cohort to about 90 percent for the first cohort. For both the first and second cohorts, about 75 percent generated at least 12 payments. (back to Exhibit XIV.5 )

Exhibit XIV.6 Total Payments for Assignments with Payments

Total Payments for Assignments with Payments, by Payment System, Payment Title, and Assignment Cohort, consists of three line graphs displaying the dollar value of payments for assignments with payments for the four assignment cohorts in three Ticket categories: SSDI milestone-outcome payment, SSDI outcome-only payment, and SSI-only milestone-outcome payment. For each category and cohort, the graphs show the percentage of assignments (on the vertical axis) generating at least the number of dollars in payments indicated on the horizontal axis. In all three graphs, the lines for the more recent cohorts fall below those for the earlier cohorts.

For SSDI milestone-outcome payments, the percentage generating at least $2,000 in revenue ranges from 50 percent for the first cohort to just over 25 percent for the fourth cohort. Almost none of these assignments has generated more than $7,000.

For SSDI outcome-only payments, the percentage generating more than $2,000 ranges from about 85 percent for the first and second cohorts to about 70 percent for the fourth cohort. For the first and second cohorts, almost 70 percent generated at least $4,000, but the corresponding value for the third and fourth cohorts is only about 30 percent. Almost 25 percent of the first cohort assignments had generated at least $7,000.

For SSI milestone-outcome payments, the percentage generating $2,000 or more ranges from about 30 percent for the first cohort to around 10 percent for the fourth cohort. Almost none of these assignments has generated more than $4,000.(back to Exhibit XIV.6 )