Research and Analysis by Joseph Greenblum

Age, Work and Capacity Devaluation
ORES Working Paper No. 30 (released September 1983)
by Joseph Greenblum

To be awarded Disability Insurance benefits, an individual must have an objectively determinable, severe medical condition or impairment that, according to Social Security regulations, is serious enough that it can be presumed to keep the individual from working. We know, however, that some people who have medical conditions serious enough to qualify them for disability benefits are nevertheless able to continue working, while others who consider themselves unable to work do not have a serious enough impairment to qualify them for benefits. Whether or not a seriously impaired individual files for Social Security Disability Insurance benefits (SSDI) will depend, in part, on his or her own self-assessment of his ability to work, i.e., whether he considers himself to be severely disabled. This self-assessment depends upon many factors in addition to the actual severity of the individual's medical condition. These factors, therefore, become important elements in the decision to apply for SSDI benefits. This report examines how the relationship between measures of actual individual functional capacity and individual self-assessments of work capacity vary by age and other important job-related attributes.

Effect of Rehabilitation on Employment and Earnings of the Disabled: Sociodemographic Factors
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 42 No. 8 (released August 1979)
by Joseph Greenblum

Effect of Vocational Rehabilitation on Employment and Earnings of the Disabled: State Variations
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 40 No. 12 (released December 1977)
by Joseph Greenblum

Evaluating Vocational Rehabilitation Programs for the Disabled: National Long-Term Followup Study
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 38 No. 10 (released October 1975)
by Joseph Greenblum

Work Values of Disabled Beneficiaries
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 50 No. 4 (released April 1987)
by Joseph Greenblum and Barry V. Bye