Research and Analysis by Kenneth A. Couch

The Incidence and Consequences of Private Sector Job Loss in the Great Recession
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 78, No. 1 (released February 2018)
by Kenneth A. Couch, Gayle L. Reznik, Howard M. Iams, and Christopher R. Tamborini

This article examines the extent and economic consequences of involuntary unemployment among private-sector workers aged 26–55 during the Great Recession. Using data from the 2008 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the authors document the effects of involuntary unemployment on earnings, income, and health insurance coverage during the economic downturn and compare outcomes across worker demographic subgroups. Those outcomes are tracked at annual intervals over a 3-year follow-up period and are compared with those of workers who did not experience a job loss. The authors discuss their findings in the context of retirement security in general and Social Security in particular.

How Effective Is the Social Security Statement? Informing Younger Workers about Social Security
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 74, No. 4 (released November 2014)
by Barbara A. Smith and Kenneth A. Couch

The Social Security Administration began mailing annual earnings and benefit statements to workers aged 60 or older in 1995, and increased its mailings to include workers in younger age groups in succeeding years. In 1998, the agency commissioned the Gallup Organization to evaluate the effects of these statements on the public's knowledge of Social Security programs and benefits. This article briefly describes the development and implementation of the Social Security Statement; discusses the Gallup surveys conducted in 1998 and 2001; and uses data from those surveys to compare, for workers aged 46 or younger, knowledge about Social Security before and after receipt of the Social Security Statement.

The Social Security Statement: Background, Implementation, and Recent Developments
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 74, No. 2 (released May 2014)
by Barbara A. Smith and Kenneth A. Couch

In 1995, the Social Security Administration (SSA) began mailing annual earnings and benefit statements to workers aged 60 or older. By 2000, SSA was sending these statements to all workers aged 25 or older. It was the largest customized mailing ever undertaken by a federal agency. This article describes the development and implementation of the Social Security Statement; the changes in its distribution, content, and appearance over time; its relationship to SSA's strategic plans; and the surveys SSA commissioned to measure public awareness and knowledge of Social Security.