DOES WHERE I LIVE AFFECT HOW MUCH SSI I CAN GET?

Yes, it can. If you live in your own place and pay your own food and shelter costs, regardless of whether you own or rent, you may get up to the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI) amount payable in your State. You also can get up to the maximum if you live in someone else's household as long as you pay your food and shelter costs. If you live in someone else's household and don't pay your food and shelter costs or pay only part of your food and shelter costs, your SSI benefit may be reduced by up to one–third of the SSI Federal benefit rate.

spotlight

DO MY LIVING EXPENSES AFFECT MY SSI BENEFIT?

Generally, they do not. Your SSI benefit amount depends on your income, not on your expenses.

WHAT IF SOMEONE ELSE HELPS PAY MY LIVING EXPENSES?

Any food or shelter you get from someone else that you do not pay for may reduce your SSI benefit. However, we do not reduce your benefit if your spouse who is living with you provides these items. Likewise, if you are a minor child, we will not reduce your benefits if a parent or parents who live with you provide these items.

There is a limit on how much food and shelter we may count. The limit is one–third of the maximum Federal SSI amount payable for a month, plus $20.

We do not consider items you receive that you cannot use for food or shelter as income. For example, if someone buys you a household or personal item, such as a small kitchen appliance, clothing, or a piece of jewelry of modest value, we will not reduce your SSI benefit.

WHAT ABOUT PEOPLE IN INSTITUTIONS?

Generally, people who live in institutions such as hospitals, nursing homes, prisons or jails are not eligible for SSI or are only eligible for a maximum of $30 a month (some States supplement this $30 benefit). However, there are some exceptions. For more information about one of these exceptions, please see the SSI Spotlight on Continued SSI Benefits for Persons Who are Temporarily Institutionalized.

WHAT ABOUT THE HOMELESS?

Having a permanent residence is not a requirement for receiving SSI. If you are homeless, you may receive up to the maximum SSI amount payable in your state. In addition, if you are receiving SSI benefits, you may be able to receive subsidized housing.

If you live in a public shelter, you can receive SSI benefits for up to 6 months out of any 9 months that you live there. For more information on homelessness see the SSI Spotlight on Homelessness.


THIS INFORMATION IS GENERAL.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 1–800–772–1213 (TTY 1–800–325–0778),
VISIT OUR WEBSITE (www.ssa.gov) ON THE INTERNET,
OR CONTACT YOUR LOCAL SOCIAL SECURITY OFFICE.