SSI only employment Supports

Earned Income Exclusion (SSI eligible)

Do we count all your earned income when we figure your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment?

We do not count the first $65 of the earnings you receive in a month, plus one-half of the remaining earnings. This means that we count less than one-half of your earnings when we figure your SSI payment amount.

We apply this exclusion in addition to the $20 general income exclusion. We apply the $20 general income exclusion first to any unearned income that you may receive.

The following table shows two examples of how we apply the general income exclusion and the earned income exclusions.

Examples of the Earned Income Exclusion (SSI eligible)

Examples of the Earned Income Exclusion
Situation 1
 
Ed receives $361 SSDI each month,
wages of $289 each month,
and no other income.
 
 
$ 361
SSDI
   -20
General income exclusion
$ 341
Countable unearned income
 
 
$ 289
Earned income
   -65
Earned income exclusion
$ 224
 
  -112
½ remaining earnings
$ 112
Countable earned income
 
 
$ 341
Countable unearned income
 +112
Countable earned income
$ 453
Total countable income
 
 
$ 721
2014 Federal Benefit Rate
 -453
Total countable income
$ 258
SSI payment
 
Available income:
$ 361
SSDI
 +289
Earned income
 +268
SSI
$ 918
Total Monthly Income
Situation 2
 
Ed receives wages of $450 each month,
no SSDI, and $13 of unearned income
from another source.
 
$   0
SSDI
$ 13
Other unearned income
  -20
General income exclusion
$ (7)
Remaining general income exclusion
 
 
$ 450
Earned income
     -7
Remaining general income exclusion
$ 443
 
    -65 
Earned income exclusion
$ 378
 
   -189
½ remaining earnings
  $ 189 
Countable earned income
 
 
$721
2014 Federal Benefit Rate
  -189 
Total countable income
$ 532
SSI payment
           
Available income:
$ 450
Earned income
 +13
Other unearned income
 +532
SSI
$ 995
Total Monthly Income

Student Earned Income Exclusion (SSI eligible)

How does the SEIE help you?

SEIE video

If you are under age 22 and regularly attending school, we do not count up to $1,750 of earned income per month when we figure your Supplemental Security Income payment amount. The maximum yearly exclusion is $7,060. These amounts are for the year 2014; we usually adjust these figures each year based on the cost-of-living.

What is the definition of “regularly attending school?”

“Regularly attending school” means that you take one or more courses of study and attend classes:

  • In a college or university for at least 8 hours a week; or

  • In grades 7-12 for at least 12 hours a week; or

  • In a training course to prepare for employment for at least 12 hours a week (15 hours a week if the course involves shop practice); or

  • For less time than indicated above for reasons beyond the student’s control, such as illness.

Does home schooling qualify?

If you are home-taught, you may be considered “regularly attending school” if:

  • You are instructed in grades 7-12 for at least 12 hours a week; and

  • The instruction is in accordance with a home school law of the state or other jurisdiction in which you reside.

If you are home-taught because of a disability, you may be considered “regularly attending school” by:

  • Studying a course or courses given by a school (grades 7-12), college, university or government agency; and

  • Having a home visitor or tutor who directs the study.

How do we apply the income exclusion?

We apply the SEIE before the general income exclusion or the earned income exclusion.

 

How about an example – For this example we are using 2014 amounts

Below are wages that Joan, a student receiving SSI, earned each month in 2014..

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

 

 

$1750

$1750

$1750

$870

$840

$800

$800

Since Joan is a student, she is eligible for the SEIE. That means we can exclude a greater amount
of Joan’s earnings when we figure her SSI benefit amount. Below are the amounts of Joan’s
monthly earnings that we do not count each month subject to the monthly and yearly limits.
Remember the 2014 monthly limit is $1,750 and the year’s limit is $7,060. In November, we
reach the yearly excludable amount of $7,060.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

 

 

$1750

$1750

$1750

$870

$840

$100

$0

Below are monthly wage amounts we still count. Since we reached the yearly limit of excludable
earnings in November, we must count all of Joan’s December earnings.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

 

 

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$700

$800

Now we apply the SSI Earned Income Exclusion (see EARNED INCOME EXCLUSION) to the remaining countable earnings. Here are the earnings we will count when we determine Joan’s SSI monthly benefits.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

 

 

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$307.50

$357.50

If Joan has no other income and is eligible for the full Federal Benefit Rate ($721), her SSI benefit
amount will be:

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

 

 

$721

$721

$721

$721

$721

$413.50

$363.50

Property Essential to Self-Support (PESS) (SSI eligible)

How does PESS help you?

We do not count some resources that are essential to your means of self-support when we decide your continuing eligibility for Supplemental Security Income.

What is not counted?

We do not count your property if you use it in a trade or business (for example, inventory or goods) or personal property you use for work as an employee (for example, tools or equipment). Other use of the item(s) does not matter.

We do not count up to $6,000 of equity value of non-business property that you use to produce goods or services essential to daily activities. An example is land you use to produce vegetables or livestock solely for consumption by your household.

We do not count up to $6,000 of the equity value of non-business income-producing property if the property yields an annual rate of return of at least 6 percent. An example is a rental property.

You must be using the property we are excluding under the PESS provision for your self-support activities. If you are not currently using this property because of circumstances beyond your control, you must expect to start using it again within a reasonable period of time, usually 12 months.

What type of resources do not qualify as PESS?

We do not consider liquid resources, for example, stocks, bonds, or notes as PESS, unless you use them as part of a trade or business.

Special SSI Payments for Persons Who Work - Section 1619(a) (SSI eligible)

What is Section 1619(a)?

You can receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cash payments even when your earned income (gross wages and/or net earnings from self-employment) is at the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. This provision eliminates the need for the trial work period or extended period of eligibility under SSI.

How do you qualify?

To qualify, you must:

  • Have been eligible for an SSI payment for at least 1 month before you begin working at the SGA level; and

  • Still be disabled; and

  • Meet all other eligibility rules, including the income and resource tests.

How does it work?

Your eligibility for SSI will continue for as long as you meet the basic eligibility requirements and the income and resource tests. We will continue to figure your SSI payment amount in the same way as before. If your state provides Medicaid to persons on SSI, you will continue to be eligible for Medicaid.

Do you need to apply?

You do not need to file a special application. Just keep us up to date on your work activity.

Reinstating SSI Eligibility Without a New Application (SSI eligible)

How does it help you?

If you have been ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments due to your work, you may be able to restart your SSI cash payments again at any time without a new application.

If you have been ineligible for SSI and/or Medicaid for any reason other than work or medical recovery, you may be able to restart your SSI cash payment and/or Medicaid coverage within 12 months without a new application. When your situation changes, contact us and ask about how you can restart your SSI benefits and/or Medicaid.

If your cash payment and Medicaid benefits ended because of your earned income, or a combination of earned and unearned income, and you stop work within 5 years of when your benefits ended, we may be able to start your benefits again under Expedited Reinstatement (see EXPEDITED REINSTATEMENT).

Special Benefits If You Are Eligible Under 1619 and Enter a Medical Facility (SSI eligible)

How does it help you?

If you are working and eligible under section 1619, you may receive a Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cash benefit for up to 2 months while in a Medicaid facility or a public medical or psychiatric facility.

What happens if you enter a Medicaid facility?

Usually, if you enter a Medicaid facility where Medicaid pays more than 50 percent of the cost of care, your SSI payment is limited to $30 per month, plus any state supplement, minus any countable income. However, if you enter a Medicaid facility while you are eligible under section 1619, we will figure your benefit using the full Federal Benefit Rate for up to 2 months.

What happens if you enter a public medical or psychiatric facility?

Usually, if you are in a public medical or psychiatric facility, you are not eligible to receive an SSI payment. However, if you enter a public medical or psychiatric facility while you are eligible under section 1619, your SSI cash benefits may continue for up to 2 months. For this provision to apply, the facility must enter an agreement with us that will allow you to keep all of your SSI payment.

Medicaid While Working– Section 1619(b) (SSI eligible)

How does it help you?

After you return to work, your Medicaid coverage can continue, even if your earnings (alone or in combination with your other income) become too high for a Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cash payment.

How do you qualify?

To qualify, you must meet all of the following qualifications:

  • Were eligible for an SSI cash payment for at least 1 month;

  • Would be eligible for cash payment except for earnings;

  • Still be disabled;

  • Still meet all other eligibility rules, including the resources test;

  • Need Medicaid in order to work; and

  • Have gross earned income that is insufficient to replace SSI, Medicaid, and any publicly funded attendant care. (See following “threshold amount” discussion.)

The “threshold amount” is the measure that we use to decide whether your earnings are high enough to replace your SSI and Medicaid benefits. Your threshold amount is based on:

  • The amount of earnings that would cause your SSI cash payments to stop in your state; and

  • The average annual per capita Medicaid expenditure for your state.

If your gross earnings are higher than the threshold amount for your state (see following chart), you may still be eligible if you have:

Do all states use the same Medicaid eligibility rules?

Most states use our SSI eligibility rules to determine Medicaid eligibility. However, the following states use their own eligibility rules for Medicaid that are different from our SSI eligibility rules:

ConnecticutMinnesotaOhio
HawaiiMissouriOklahoma
IllinoisNew HampshireVirginia
IndianaNorth Dakota 

If you live in one of these states, you will continue to be eligible for Medicaid under section 1619(a) or 1619(b) if you were eligible for Medicaid in the month before you became eligible for section 1619.

2014 State Threshold Amounts for Persons with Disabilities (SSI eligible)

STATETHRESHOLD STATETHRESHOLD

Alabama

$26,420

Montana

$30,227

Alaska

$56,786

Nebraska

$37,894

Arizona

$35,773

Nevada

$30,841

Arkansas

$30,482

New Hampshire

$38,505

California

$36,928

New Jersey

$34,405

Colorado

$34,055

New Mexico

$33,349

Connecticut

$68,340

New York

$44,657

Delaware

$40,447

North Carolina

$34,424

District of Columbia

$39,833

North Dakota

$43,582

Florida

$30,750

Ohio

$36,063

Georgia

$28,820

Oklahoma

$30,252

Hawaii

$36,713

Oregon

$32,725

Idaho

$40,196

Pennsylvania

$35,897

Illinois

$27,829

Rhode Island

$34,452

Indiana

$37,010

South Carolina

$30,142

Iowa

$32,338

South Dakota

$36,599

Kansas

$34,584

Tennessee

$36,313

Kentucky

$29,725

Texas

$33,407

Louisiana

$31,235

Utah

$34,103

Maine

$32,411

Vermont

$38,783

Maryland

$41,746

Virginia

$33,862

Massachusetts

$39,730

Washington

$29,683

Michigan

$34,260

West Virginia

$30,531

Minnesota

$51,268

Wisconsin

$33,361

Mississippi

$28,499

Wyoming

$36,447

Missouri

$36,140

N. Mariana Islands

$18,324

2014 States with Separate Threshold Amounts for Blind Persons(SSI eligible)

STATETHRESHOLD

California

$38,248

Iowa

$32,866

Massachusetts

$40,579

Nevada

$33,464