Annual Statistical Report on the Social Security Disability Insurance Program, 2016

Beneficiaries in Current-Payment Status

Chart 1. All Social Security disabled beneficiaries in current-payment status, December 2016

In December 2016, there were 10,153,205 people receiving Social Security disability benefits as disabled workers, disabled widow(er)s, or disabled adult children. The majority (86.8 percent) were disabled workers, 10.7 percent were disabled adult children, and 2.6 percent were disabled widow(er)s.

Pie chart described in previous paragraph.
SOURCE: Table 3.
NOTE: Totals do not necessarily equal the sum of rounded components.
Chart 2. All Social Security disabled beneficiaries in current-payment status, December 1970–2016

The number of disabled beneficiaries has risen from 1,812,786 in 1970 to 10,153,205 in 2016, driven predominately by an increase in the number of disabled workers. The number of disabled adult children has grown slightly, and the number of disabled widow(er)s has remained fairly level. In December 2016, there were 8,808,736 disabled workers; 1,085,262 disabled adult children; and 259,207 disabled widow(er)s receiving disability benefits.

Line chart linked to data in table format.
SOURCE: Table 3.
Chart 3. Disabled beneficiaries aged 18–64 in current-payment status as a percentage of state population aged 18–64, December 2016

Disabled beneficiaries aged 18–64 in current-payment status accounted for 4.7 percent of the population aged 18–64 in the United States. In three states, they represented less than 3 percent of the state population. The states with the highest rates of disabled beneficiaries—7 percent or more—were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, and West Virginia.

Map linked to data in table format.
SOURCE: Table 8.
Chart 4. Age of disabled-worker beneficiaries in current-payment status, by sex, December 2016

The percentage of disabled-worker beneficiaries increases with age for both men and women. In December 2016, the largest percentage of disabled-worker beneficiaries was aged 60–64. Disability benefits convert to retirement benefits when the worker reaches full retirement age, 65–67, depending on the year of birth.

Bar chart linked to data in table format.
SOURCE: Table 4.
NOTE: FRA = full retirement age.
Chart 5. Average monthly benefit of disabled beneficiaries in current-payment status, by sex, December 2016

The average monthly benefit for disabled-worker beneficiaries is higher than that paid to disabled widow(er)s or disabled adult children. The reason for the difference is that disabled workers receive 100 percent of the primary insurance amount (PIA), compared with 71.5 percent for disabled widow(er)s and 50 percent for disabled adult children (if the worker is disabled or retired) or 75 percent (if the worker is deceased).

Because men have traditionally had higher earnings than women, their monthly benefit is higher. This is most obvious in the disabled-worker group. Benefits for disabled widow(er)s and disabled adult children are dependents' benefits, so their monthly benefit is a function of the worker's earnings. Therefore, a disabled widow's average benefit tends to be higher than that of a disabled widower because a male worker's earnings are higher than a female worker's. Benefit amounts are about the same for men and women in the disabled adult children group.

Bar chart linked to data in table format.
SOURCE: Table 4.
Chart 6. Disabled beneficiaries in current-payment status, by diagnostic group, December 2016

The impairment on which disability is based varies with the type of beneficiary. In December 2016, diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue were the primary reason disabled workers and disabled widow(er)s received benefits; intellectual disability was the predominant reason for disability among disabled adult children.

Bar chart linked to data in table format.
SOURCE: Table 6.